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Healing at Home: 4 Household Products that May Potentially Kill Athlete’s Foot Fungus

Heat and humidity are on the rise this time of year — and along with that comes an increase in foot fungus. Athlete’s foot is generally treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication, but some people find that the infections come back repeatedly. The People’s Pharmacy claims that there are a number of household products a person can use to kill recurrent athlete’s foot fungus in a pinch. Generally speaking, the household cures for athlete’s foot either “stink, sting or stain.”

athlete's foot fungus

Some people claim a vinegar foot soak can heal the damage done by athlete’s foot fungus.

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Antifungal Cream: Amazon Consumers’ Top Picks for Treating Foot Fungus

Two names stand out in the world of antifungal foot creams: Lotrimin and Lamisil. Lotramin uses prescription-strength Butenafine to treat athlete’s foot, whereas Lamisil uses prescription-strength terbinafine to treat foot fungus. If you have tried these medications and they did not work for you, there are a few other options that Amazon buyers say have provided favorable results.

antifungal cream

We look at some of the top picks for antifungal creams.
Image Source: Wikimedia.org

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Foot Fungus and Fashion: Can You Contract Athlete’s Foot from Shoe Shopping?

Podiatrists are warning that shoe shopping has caused an uptick in cases of athlete’s foot and plantar warts. We’d all like to think that our feet have been the first to grace a brand new shoe off the shelf, but that’s wishful thinking. Seven out of ten women like to try before they buy shoes, so it’s very likely that not every shoe was a perfect fit.

shoe display

Most women try on several pairs of shoes before finding the ideal size, style and fit.
Image Source: Flickr user Robert S. Donovan

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Battling Athlete’s Foot: Understanding Tinea Pedis and Examining Various Treatments

Athlete’s foot is an annoying malady, to say the least. It can also become costly to treat. The cost of treating a bout of athlete’s foot can range from $9 to $85, according to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee. What you pay depends upon a myriad of factors, including the type of infection, the severity, the type of medication purchased, and where you buy it. Given the expense, it’s not surprising that many people would rather find an affordable home remedy for athlete’s foot than pay the pharmacist. Yet, you are probably wondering… are these treatments worth your time?

athlete's foot fungus

There are many different products that can treat athlete’s foot fungus infections.

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Fighting Fungus: Europeans Try Aerated Shoeboxes to Combat Athlete’s Foot

In America, topical creams and prescription drugs are the first athlete’s foot treatments that come to mind. However, Modelsa Plastik in Turkey is experimenting with the use of aerated shoeboxes to cut down on the athlete’s foot risk. Company CEO Abdullah Ayodogan said there are sanitary concerns with using cardboard shoeboxes, and that his new product uses air ducts to increase air flow inside the box and prevent the spread of athlete’s foot fungus.

shoe collecting

In some places, plastic shoeboxes are all the rage among shoe collectors.

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Addressing Concerns for Diabetics: Skin Care Products for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

Shoe Care Innovations invented the SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer as an easy way of ridding one’s footwear of bacteria and fungi that could otherwise thrive and multiply into enormous colonies and cause festering foot infections. Ultraviolet light is a safe, natural, and effective method of preventing pathogens from reproducing or doing the body any harm. For people with diabetes, it’s especially important to keep the feet as clean and sanitized as possible. Our microbe-fighting product is one step in preventing diabetic foot infections. Prevention of an ulcerous break in the skin is another important factor to consider, so we’ve compiled a list of pressure ulcer prevention products.

antimicrobial cleanser

HibiClens is a hospital-grade antimicrobial cleanser diabetics can use on their feet.

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Innovations for Health: Can a Body Dryer Help You Prevent Athlete’s Foot Fungus?

A futuristic new gadget promises to revolutionize the bathroom as we know it. The Body Dryer may look like an ordinary bathroom scale — and it is a weight scale… but it’s also a body dryer that eliminates the need for bath towels. Can this help people who suffer from chronic athlete’s foot infections? We think it just might.

body dryer

The Body Dryer may put an end to unsanitary towels once and for all.

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Fungus in the News: Rhizopus in Hospital Linens Leads to Deadly Infection in Youngsters

A recent story in the NY Times plays into one of our greatest phobias — coming down with a sudden, fatal, unstoppable illness. The victims — a newborn boy in the NICU, a 10-year-old girl, and a 13-year-old boy — died at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans between August 2008 and July 2009. The children had horrible, mysterious open wounds on their abdomens, groins, and faces. Eventually, it was uncovered that the youngsters had come down with a flesh-eating fungal infection called mucormycosis caused by the fungus known as Rhizopus– and that fungus was spread by hospital bed linens and towels.

children's hospital of new orleans

What happened at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans could have happened anywhere. Administrators say they regret not being more proactive.
Image Source: CHNOLA.org

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Foot Fungus Awareness: Can You Get Athlete’s Foot from Laundry?

A college student recently wondered just how contagious athlete’s foot can be. “We have a communal area in my dorm for laundry,” he wrote. “One of the guys here has athlete’s foot. Can I catch it from putting my clothes where he washed his clothes?” There is no easy response to this question, but we decided to explore this question further to give you the most scientific answer we could dig up.

athlete's foot laundry

Athlete’s foot fungus can transfer from socks to other articles of clothing in the wash, say researchers.
Image Source: Wikihow.com

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Dealing with Stinky Feet? 10 Natural Home Remedies to Alleviate Odor

Stinky feet — or “bromhidrosis” — is a medical condition resulting from the combination of perspiration and bacteria. Additional factors include moist socks, dead skin, and trapping the feet inside shoes all day long. Not everyone is as proud of clearing a room with their feet, as this young girl who was recognized in the Odor-Eaters “Hall of Fumes.” Here are a few natural home remedies to treat smelly feet and shoes.

feet with odor wafting

Are smelly feet ruining your social life? Try these 10 natural foot odor treatments.
Image Source: hottogetrid.org

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