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The Healing Wonders of Moose Saliva: Could It Be a Legit Foot Fungus Treatment?

Moose are interesting animals. Like camels, they are particularly slobbery creatures. Yet, this excess saliva has an unusual benefit for the animal, York University biologist Dawn Bazely told the CBCApparently, moose saliva helps reduce the amount of fungus picked up from the vegetation it eats. Some of their favorite grazing plants use fungi for self-protection — and too much fungi makes a moose sick. Can moose saliva be used in foot fungus treatments one day? Perhaps!

foot fungus saliva

Can a moose help to cure foot fungus? Scientists explore.
Image Source: Hagerty Ryan, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia.org

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Fungus Alert: The Importance of Making Sure Your Nail Spa Is Up to Code

There’s nothing like treating yourself to a day at the spa. A little bit of pampering can make a person feel refreshed and rejuvenated. Unfortunately, some manicure and pedicure salons can leave visitors with unwanted side effects that last weeks, months, or even years. Though rare, fungal infections stem from unsanitary practices and contaminated equipment. In today’s article, we’ll discuss the prevalence of fungus in salons and how to tell if your local spa is up to code.

nail salon fungus

Pedicures are a great way to pamper yourself — but only if your salon is up to code!
Image Source: Sarah_Ackerman via Wikimedia.org

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Say Goodbye to Fungal Freeloaders: Examining Candida, Symptoms, and Treatment

In elementary school, we learn about symbiotic relationships: the lamprey that cleans debris off the shark; the bio-luminescent bacteria that attracts food for the anglerfish; the bees that pollinate the flowers. We tend to think of ourselves as autonomous beings, but — just as you are comprised of cells and genes — you are also comprised of microscopic organisms from your environment. Sometimes these trillions of microbes help us, such as the case of the one kilogram of intestinal “good” bacteria. Yet, other times, the parasites take advantage of their kindly hosts, causing them harm.

candida diet

You can see the spores of candida albicans in this image.

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Cleansing Treatment: A Few of Our Favorite Antifungal Soaps

If you’ve ever struggled with foot fungus like athlete’s foot or toenail fungus, then you know firsthand just how aggravating the problem can be. Naturally, you want to do everything you can to beat these unwanted pathogens. The easiest place to take care of business is the shower. The makers of the SteriShoe Ultra-Violet Shoe Sanitizer, the only clinically proven way to sanitize footwear of fungus and bacteria, have assembled a helpful list of antifungal soaps (made with tea tree oil) that you may use in addition to their product.

tea tree oil soap

Tea tree oil is a natural antifungal agent.

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Being Prepared for Anything: Does Your Handbag Contain Athlete’s Foot Prevention Items?

Any woman will tell you that some pretty weird items can be found inside any given handbag. Some of these items may even be quite embarrassing. From tiny flashlights and “emergency” packets of peanut butter, to packets of moleskin and tweezers, there’s no telling what you’ll find in a woman’s bottomless pit of a bag. Many women also carry slipper shoes in their purses — they go by names like Rollasole, SpareSoles, and Dr. Scholl’s Fast Foldable Flats — for more reasons than one. Perhaps it’s to give themselves a break from the relentlessness of heels… or perhaps it’s to avoid getting athlete’s foot fungus from other people’s houses!

full purse

What odd items are in YOUR handbag? Make sure you’re prepared with foot care products!

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Just “Plane” Gross: What You Can Do to Beat Germs During Air Travel

As summer kicks into high gear, many people will be taking to the skies for vacation getaways. We’ll be the first to admit we don’t particularly love traveling by plane. While it gets us from here to there in record time, there can be a lot of hassles, from baggage fees to the icky shoe removal policy while going through security. Now researchers have a new reason for us to loathe air travel. Research shows that infectious, disease-causing bacteria and airplane germs can live for weeks on most airplane surfaces.

plane taking off

Find out where germs lurk on planes and how long they live.
Image Source: Flickr user Joao Carlos Medau

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Battling Athlete’s Foot: Understanding Tinea Pedis and Examining Various Treatments

Athlete’s foot is an annoying malady, to say the least. It can also become costly to treat. The cost of treating a bout of athlete’s foot can range from $9 to $85, according to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee. What you pay depends upon a myriad of factors, including the type of infection, the severity, the type of medication purchased, and where you buy it. Given the expense, it’s not surprising that many people would rather find an affordable home remedy for athlete’s foot than pay the pharmacist. Yet, you are probably wondering… are these treatments worth your time?

athlete's foot fungus

There are many different products that can treat athlete’s foot fungus infections.

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Fungus in the News: Rhizopus in Hospital Linens Leads to Deadly Infection in Youngsters

A recent story in the NY Times plays into one of our greatest phobias — coming down with a sudden, fatal, unstoppable illness. The victims — a newborn boy in the NICU, a 10-year-old girl, and a 13-year-old boy — died at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans between August 2008 and July 2009. The children had horrible, mysterious open wounds on their abdomens, groins, and faces. Eventually, it was uncovered that the youngsters had come down with a flesh-eating fungal infection called mucormycosis caused by the fungus known as Rhizopus– and that fungus was spread by hospital bed linens and towels.

children's hospital of new orleans

What happened at Children’s Hospital of New Orleans could have happened anywhere. Administrators say they regret not being more proactive.
Image Source: CHNOLA.org

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Medication Monitoring: Can Diabetics Take Lamisil for Toenail Fungus or Athlete’s Foot?

More than 1 in 4 seniors gulp down at least five medications daily, according to US News & World ReportDiabetics are among those patients taking multiple medications, in addition to injecting themselves with insulin if their disease is particularly difficult to manage. They must take heed before treating any malady, as the addition of a new drug may interfere with one of their other prescriptions. If you are a diabetic dealing with toenail fungus, you may be wondering if it’s safe to take the popular oral drug terbinafine (a.k.a. Lamisil).

diabetes drug interaction

Many diabetics take multiple pills to manage their condition each day, which increases the risk of interaction with antifungal drugs.
Image Source: WebMD.com

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Take Strides to Protect Your Feet: 3 Reasons Diabetics Should Invest in Shoe Orthoses

People with diabetes can achieve the best possible health by managing the various risks they face. Poor circulation is one complication caused by elevated blood sugars. This condition makes it more difficult for wounds to heal — particularly wounds in the lower extremities.

Another complication — nerve damage — makes it possible for slow-healing wounds to go undetected for long periods of time. During this time, bacteria, viruses, and fungi can easily infect the wound. We wash our clothes daily, but fail to follow any regular protocol for our footwear — and yet, this dark, damp, warm environment is where pathogens like to procreate most.

To avoid dangerous diabetic foot infections resulting in hospitalization, surgery, and/or amputation, we recommend preventing foot wounds with orthoses and preventing microbial buildup with a SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer.

diabetic orthoses

There are several different types of orthoses to choose from.
Image Source: KLMLabs.com

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