Posts

Healing at Home: 4 Household Products that May Potentially Kill Athlete’s Foot Fungus

Heat and humidity are on the rise this time of year — and along with that comes an increase in foot fungus. Athlete’s foot is generally treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication, but some people find that the infections come back repeatedly. The People’s Pharmacy claims that there are a number of household products a person can use to kill recurrent athlete’s foot fungus in a pinch. Generally speaking, the household cures for athlete’s foot either “stink, sting or stain.”

athlete's foot fungus

Some people claim a vinegar foot soak can heal the damage done by athlete’s foot fungus.

Read more

Foot Fungus and Fashion: Can You Contract Athlete’s Foot from Shoe Shopping?

Podiatrists are warning that shoe shopping has caused an uptick in cases of athlete’s foot and plantar warts. We’d all like to think that our feet have been the first to grace a brand new shoe off the shelf, but that’s wishful thinking. Seven out of ten women like to try before they buy shoes, so it’s very likely that not every shoe was a perfect fit.

shoe display

Most women try on several pairs of shoes before finding the ideal size, style and fit.
Image Source: Flickr user Robert S. Donovan

Read more

Examining PDRN: Tissue Repair Drug Helps Heal Diabetic Foot Ulcers

For most people, fungi and bacteria are an inconvenience warranting a trip to the doctor’s and a course of antibiotics or antifungal medication. However, people with diabetes literally risk life and limb by not treating these pathogens immediately, at the first sign of infection. Diabetic foot ulcers are lesions that do not heal in a timely fashion. When sores do not heal, microbial colonies flourish and spread among the surrounding tissues, causing cell death and gangrene that may warrant amputation. These sores also become an open portal to the body to pick up deadly infections, like staph and MRSA.

diabetic foot infection

Diabetic foot ulcers are no joke. They can result in amputation of toes, portions of the foot, or entire limbs.

We created a device called the SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer to kill off dangerous pathogens living inside the footwear of diabetics. Limiting the amount of microbes you come into contact with is an important facet of treatment. People who already have diabetic foot ulcers will need to aggressively treat the infection under the care of a doctor. Recently, researchers found that a certain tissue repair drug makes patients with ulcers twice as likely to heal within eight weeks when compared to a placebo.

Read more

Fighting Fungus: Europeans Try Aerated Shoeboxes to Combat Athlete’s Foot

In America, topical creams and prescription drugs are the first athlete’s foot treatments that come to mind. However, Modelsa Plastik in Turkey is experimenting with the use of aerated shoeboxes to cut down on the athlete’s foot risk. Company CEO Abdullah Ayodogan said there are sanitary concerns with using cardboard shoeboxes, and that his new product uses air ducts to increase air flow inside the box and prevent the spread of athlete’s foot fungus.

shoe collecting

In some places, plastic shoeboxes are all the rage among shoe collectors.

Read more

Foot Fungus Awareness: Can You Get Athlete’s Foot from Laundry?

A college student recently wondered just how contagious athlete’s foot can be. “We have a communal area in my dorm for laundry,” he wrote. “One of the guys here has athlete’s foot. Can I catch it from putting my clothes where he washed his clothes?” There is no easy response to this question, but we decided to explore this question further to give you the most scientific answer we could dig up.

athlete's foot laundry

Athlete’s foot fungus can transfer from socks to other articles of clothing in the wash, say researchers.
Image Source: Wikihow.com

Read more

Promising Treatment Method: Will Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Help to Heal Diabetic Foot Wounds?

A person recently wrote in to The Town Talk concerned about their 84-year-old diabetic father who has had a foot wound for five months. A podiatrist debrided the diabetic foot wound, prescribed antibiotics, and changed the bandages regularly, but the writer was wondering if hyperbaric treatment could help in this case. Many users of the SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer are diabetics who are also worried about foot health and hygiene, so the portent for hyperbaric oxygen treatment is something we’re very much interested in.

chronic diabetic foot wound

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an advanced treatment for chronic diabetic foot wounds.
Image Source: MemorialHermann.org

Read more

Athlete’s Foot Misconceptions: 5 Myths Regarding Tinea Pedis

For years, Peggy Neilson struggled with recurring athlete’s foot infections after picking up the fungus from a public pool. This embarrassing problem left her with destroyed toenails, unsightly skin, and dry cracks in her heels that caused extreme pain. She tried prescription topical medication, foot soaks, wearing flip-flops in public, avoiding professional pedicures, and shoe sanitization.

A 90-day course of oral Lamisil from a podiatrist finally broke the cycle of re-infection, but Neilson advises, “In addition to getting oral medication, you are going to have to implement a multi-pronged approach to beating this infection.” A SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer is part of this multi-faceted approach to athlete’s foot relief. In order to come up with a good game plan, you will have to make sure you’re not falling for these five common athlete’s foot myths.

athlete's goot drawing

Many myths surround athlete’s foot fungus infections.
Image Source: kidshealth.org

Read more

5 Tips to Manage Type II Diabetes Symptoms

Type II Diabetes is a chronic condition that occurs when elevated levels of blood sugar persist. Most cases of Type II Diabetes are preventable with healthy diet and exercise habits, but factors like age, gender and genetics can also contribute to the development of the disease. Once you have Type II Diabetes, you are stuck with it, so understanding how to manage the symptoms through lifestyle modification is key.

type 2 diabetes

85% of Type 2 Diabetes cases and side effects can be prevented, delayed or treated.
Image Source: Healthline.com

Read more

Innovation in Preventative Care: Can Smart Socks Detect Diabetic Foot Ulcers?

Ten to fifteen percent of diabetics will suffer a foot ulcer over the course of their lifetime. A wound that won’t heal may not sound like such a big deal, but the longer it takes for a wound to heal, the longer it is at risk of becoming infected. Worse yet, the risk of amputation correlates with an increase in mortality within the next five years! Researchers are scrambling to find new ways of helping diabetics prevent the complications associated with a foot ulcer through early detection. Our product — the SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer — helps diabetics keep their footwear free from bacteria, viruses, and fungi, but we are also interested in the latest scientific development, such as ulcer-detecting socks.

diebetic foot ulcer costs

Diabetic foot ulcers cost U.S. hospitals $43,000 per patient.
Image Source: Mölnlycke.com

Read more

Nature’s Healing Properties: Home Remedies for Skin Conditions, Like Athlete’s Foot

The skin is one of the most sensitive parts of the body because it possesses so many sensory receptors. Millions of Americans suffer from some form of sensitive skin to a certain degree. Miami Dermatologist Leslie Baumann, MD, FAAD says that up to 50% of her patients suffer from sensitive skin, whether it manifests as acne, rosacea, stinging and redness, or contact dermatitis allergy. Personal care products are loaded with suspected carcinogens and irritating chemicals, so home remedies for skin conditions are a popular topic of interest on the internet. Whether you have acne or athlete’s foot, there are natural treatments for almost every type of skin condition. Do they work? Well, that is up to you to find out!

sensitive skin

Are you cursed with sensitive skin? If so, then a natural remedy for athlete’s foot may be in the cards for you.
Image Source: Flickr user dermatology.com

Read more