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The Nature of Athlete’s Foot: Why Does Fungus Seem More Prevalent Among Runners?

Athlete’s foot is a broad term for a type of foot fungus. Anyone — even non-athletes — can catch it from the environment, but the fungus seems to be more prevalent among long distance runners in particular. “My daughter is a keen runner and she regularly suffers from athlete’s foot. What can she do to prevent it?” wonders a parent from Glasgow, Scotland, writing in to the Evening Times. Fortunately, the makers of SteriShoe, a UV shoe sanitizer, have the answers.

athlete's foot runners

Athlete’s foot attacks runners disproportionately because their feet are trapped in warm, damp shoes for such extended periods of time.
Image Source: SneakerReport.com

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Kayakers Seek Remedies for Athlete’s Foot- Water Sports May Bring About Uncomfortable Foot Fungus

Fungus thrives in damp, dark, warm environments. This is a big problem for kayakers whose feet are trapped in damp, dark, warm water shoes for extended periods of time while out on the water. Athlete’s foot is one of the most common maladies suffered, but toenail fungus, bacterial infections, and trench foot are possible issues that may arise, as well. The good news is that there are plenty of ways to keep your feet fungus-free while enjoying your favorite pastime!

kayaking shoes

Kayaking trips are great fun if you have the right footwear!
Image Source: SundanceKayak.com

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Keep Foot Fungus at Bay: 3 Key Reminders for the Prevention of Athlete's Foot

Athlete’s foot doesn’t just plague athletes. It can infect anyone who comes into contact with the type of dermatophyte fungus responsible for the itchy, red, burning patches. This common fungal infection is most prevalent in public areas, like locker rooms, swimming pools and showers — hence the “athlete” portion of the name — but it can also lurk in grass and on any hard surface. If you suspect you have come into contact with foot fungus, it’s best to apply an over-the-counter antifungal cream from your local pharmacy. We explore three ways to prevent this unsightly, uncomfortable foot condition.

athlete's foot

You can try to make light of athlete’s foot, but this irritating condition is no laughing matter!
Image Source: Someecards.com

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Diagnosis Help Desk: Is It Athlete’s Foot or Dry Skin?

“I’d say 70% of cases — what they think is dry skin — is actually athlete’s foot,” says Sima Soltani DPM, a professor of surgery at George Washington University Medical Center. He adds that many patients go to a podiatrist after several years of unsuccessfully treating their “dry skin.”

The differences between a foot fungus and scaly, dry patches can be subtle. Web MD says that “athlete’s foot can look different in each person” — with some people experiencing peeling and cracking between the toes, while others have dryness or redness on the soles of their feet. We’ll give you a few ways of detecting just what you’re dealing with and treating the condition accordingly.

dry feet

Here is a case of dry feet. Notice the lack of redness, blisters, or pattern.
Image Source: DanLikesThis.info

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Experiencing More Than Itchy Toes? 4 Complications Associated with Tinea Pedis

Tinea pedis — or athlete’s foot — is a chronic foot infection that manifests itself as an itchy, red, scaly rash between the toes and along the soles. Sometimes the condition leads to complications, especially if the patients are immuno-suppressed, diabetic, or allergy sufferers. Once a fungus invades the body, the tissues may become susceptible to other attacks. In this article, we’ll examine four common complications that occur concurrently with athlete’s foot.

athlete's foot

Is it just athlete’s foot… or are you also suffering from one of the four coexisting conditions that often accompany this fungal infection?
Image Source: lacpms.com

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Never Forget the Shower Shoes: 3 Tips for Preventing Foot Fungus in College

Fox News mentions mold and athlete’s foot fungus as two of the nine “health hazards hidden in college dorms.” Any time you gather together many different people from many different places into a communal sleeping and bathing environment, you’re bound to find a few contagious microbes.

Back in 2011, two Maryland dorm rooms became so badly infested with mold that students had to live on a lavish cruise ship! All fungal outbreaks don’t end so well, though. Often, treatment is long, aggravating, and expensive, so it’s best to prevent foot fungus in college if you can.

dorm shower

Dorm bathrooms and showers can harbor a lot of harmful bacteria and fungus.
Image Source: Flickr user David Lai

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The Amazing Powers of Coconut Oil: A Cure For Athlete's Foot?

Coconut oil is one of the latest natural remedies for athlete’s foot, touted in both holistic blogs and books. It promises to be a relatively inexpensive remedy for foot fungus — and one that does not pose any risk of adverse side effects like most over-the-counter medications. We look into this alleged athlete’s foot cure and give you additional advice on curing athlete’s foot naturally.

antifungal oil

Coconut oil has many uses, in addition to being heralded as an “antibacterial / antifungal” agent.
Image Source: HealingHypothyroidism.com

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How Wet Socks Cause Fungal Infections: Banish Water-Loving Cotton to Keep Your Feet Fungus Free!

Today we want to talk to you about a very serious issue: the socks in your drawer! These trusty companions accompany your feet each day, but how much thought have you really given them lately? Your mother probably buys them for you as Christmas gifts and you just assume that smelly feet or fungal infections are par for the course in this world. However, the type of socks we wear can be a contributing factor to athlete’s foot fungus and toenail infections.

foot fungus socks

Are your socks contributing to foot fungus?
Image Source: Eurodiabesity.org

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Famous Cases of Tinea Pedis Outbreaks and Tips on Avoiding This Widespread Foot Fungus

We’ve all heard that athlete’s foot (scientifically known as tinea pedis) is one very contagious foot fungus. Yet, just how contagious is it? Should you be worried whenever you step foot in your gym’s locker room, or should you just avoid using other people’s towels to dry off? A few famous cases of athlete’s foot outbreaks show just how an epidemic can grow from just a few scales of foot fungus shed in a public place.

tinea pedis outbreak

It’s a wise idea to cover your feet in a public wash house, as these tinea pedis outbreaks clearly show.
Image Source: CollegeHumor.com

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Biology Professor Hopes To Cure Athlete's Foot With Probiotic Solution

Back in May, we wrote about how athlete’s foot fungus was killing off frogs in Central America and the Caribbean. Since 2002, James Madison University biology professor Reid Harris has been working with probiotics to see if he can kill off the bad bacteria with good bacteria. Faculty assistant Eria Rebollar explains that the fungus infects frogs by growing inside the amphibians’ skin and eats away at the outer layer, affecting the frog’s ability to breathe.

frog fungus

Chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) spreading through the streams of Central America has been killing off many species of frogs, including this lemur leaf frog. Image Source: ScienceBuzz.org

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