The Healing Wonders of Moose Saliva: Could It Be a Legit Foot Fungus Treatment?

Moose are interesting animals. Like camels, they are particularly slobbery creatures. Yet, this excess saliva has an unusual benefit for the animal, York University biologist Dawn Bazely told the CBCApparently, moose saliva helps reduce the amount of fungus picked up from the vegetation it eats. Some of their favorite grazing plants use fungi for self-protection — and too much fungi makes a moose sick. Can moose saliva be used in foot fungus treatments one day? Perhaps!

foot fungus saliva

Can a moose help to cure foot fungus? Scientists explore.
Image Source: Hagerty Ryan, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via Wikimedia.org

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Why is Lotrimin Restricted in California?

Most Americans don’t even think twice when it comes to slathering on over-the-counter topical medication for a skin ailment. (Hey, anything to avoid a trip to the doctor, right?!) But sometimes we place too much faith in the products that are available to us. While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does their best to keep up with the latest safety information, we fall way short of European Union standards. Many ingredients that have been banned for years in Europe in light of scientific discoveries still appear freely in products sold in The United States. One of these ingredients is known carcinogen Diethanolamine, which is found in Lotrimin Antifungal Cream.

lotrimin antifungal cream

What’s in Lotrimin may sicken you! Image Source: Drugs.com

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How Contagious Is Athlete’s Foot? Your Bad Habits, Not Others, May Be to Blame

New York University scientist Dr. Rudolf L. Baer wants you to know that you may have the fungus that causes athlete’s foot on your feet at this very moment. He’d like to dispel the myth that athlete’s foot is easily contagious from person to person, with the itchy, burning condition arising the moment someone comes into contact with a contaminated foot bath, shower room floor, yoga mat, or bed sheet. He wants the population to take another look at how the foot fungus really spreads and what we should really be doing to prevent it.

bare feet may contract athlete's foot

Are your bad habits setting you at risk for contracting athlete’s foot fungus?
Image Source: Flickr user Nicholas A. Tonelli

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Risks & Rewards: 4 of Nature’s Wonderful Antibiotics

This time of year, families are out hiking, camping and spending days at the beach. Having a well-stocked family first aid kit is imperative. However, you needn’t spend a fortune on items that have limited shelf lives. Instead, why not add some of nature’s wonderful antibiotics into the mix? As the makers of the SteriShoe UV shoe sanitizer, we truly believe that nature sometimes has the best answers to our problems. While natural remedies may not always be suitable for infants under 12 months, research shows they are well tolerated and often effective for older children and adults. Here are a few essentials for your kit.

natural antibiotics

Natural antibiotics help boost immunity.

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Healing at Home: 4 Household Products that May Potentially Kill Athlete’s Foot Fungus

Heat and humidity are on the rise this time of year — and along with that comes an increase in foot fungus. Athlete’s foot is generally treated with over-the-counter antifungal medication, but some people find that the infections come back repeatedly. The People’s Pharmacy claims that there are a number of household products a person can use to kill recurrent athlete’s foot fungus in a pinch. Generally speaking, the household cures for athlete’s foot either “stink, sting or stain.”

athlete's foot fungus

Some people claim a vinegar foot soak can heal the damage done by athlete’s foot fungus.

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Please Don’t Tell Anyone, Doc: The Embarrassment of Athlete’s Foot

Feet trapped inside shoes tend to be out of sight, out of mind. So it’s no surprise that the idea of discussing these under-appreciated body parts has many patients feeling a little squeamish. No one wants to admit their imperfections, especially when it involves something as icky as foot fungus. Having a fungal foot infection does not mean you are a “dirty” or “unhygienic” person, but a lot of people feel that way. This is our second article in a series about embarrassing foot problems you may not want to discuss with your doctor, let alone anyone else.

athlete's foot

You don’t have to be an athlete to develop athlete’s foot, although it is commonly picked up from locker room floors.
Image Source: Josh Hallett via Wikimedia.org

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Antifungal Cream: Amazon Consumers’ Top Picks for Treating Foot Fungus

Two names stand out in the world of antifungal foot creams: Lotrimin and Lamisil. Lotramin uses prescription-strength Butenafine to treat athlete’s foot, whereas Lamisil uses prescription-strength terbinafine to treat foot fungus. If you have tried these medications and they did not work for you, there are a few other options that Amazon buyers say have provided favorable results.

antifungal cream

We look at some of the top picks for antifungal creams.
Image Source: Wikimedia.org

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Foot Fungus and Fashion: Can You Contract Athlete’s Foot from Shoe Shopping?

Podiatrists are warning that shoe shopping has caused an uptick in cases of athlete’s foot and plantar warts. We’d all like to think that our feet have been the first to grace a brand new shoe off the shelf, but that’s wishful thinking. Seven out of ten women like to try before they buy shoes, so it’s very likely that not every shoe was a perfect fit.

shoe display

Most women try on several pairs of shoes before finding the ideal size, style and fit.
Image Source: Flickr user Robert S. Donovan

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Being Prepared for Anything: Does Your Handbag Contain Athlete’s Foot Prevention Items?

Any woman will tell you that some pretty weird items can be found inside any given handbag. Some of these items may even be quite embarrassing. From tiny flashlights and “emergency” packets of peanut butter, to packets of moleskin and tweezers, there’s no telling what you’ll find in a woman’s bottomless pit of a bag. Many women also carry slipper shoes in their purses — they go by names like Rollasole, SpareSoles, and Dr. Scholl’s Fast Foldable Flats — for more reasons than one. Perhaps it’s to give themselves a break from the relentlessness of heels… or perhaps it’s to avoid getting athlete’s foot fungus from other people’s houses!

full purse

What odd items are in YOUR handbag? Make sure you’re prepared with foot care products!

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Battling Athlete’s Foot: Understanding Tinea Pedis and Examining Various Treatments

Athlete’s foot is an annoying malady, to say the least. It can also become costly to treat. The cost of treating a bout of athlete’s foot can range from $9 to $85, according to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee. What you pay depends upon a myriad of factors, including the type of infection, the severity, the type of medication purchased, and where you buy it. Given the expense, it’s not surprising that many people would rather find an affordable home remedy for athlete’s foot than pay the pharmacist. Yet, you are probably wondering… are these treatments worth your time?

athlete's foot fungus

There are many different products that can treat athlete’s foot fungus infections.

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